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Nine Men's Morris - Game Board and Rules

$0.00
Nine Men's Morris is an ancient board game with the quickness of checkers, the strategy of chess, and the simplicity of tic-tac-toe. Use a simple photo frame from the dollar store, and playing pieces like pennies and nickels to create a class-wide or schoo
Electronic File Download (Size 139 KB)

Product Description

Use a simple photo frame from the dollar store, and playing pieces like pennies and nickels to create a class-wide or school-wide tournament using this timeless game of strategy!

History

Nine Men's Morris is an ancient board game with the quickness of checkers, the strategy of chess, and the simplicity of tic-tac-toe.

For over 600 years, people have been playing the fun and fulfilling game. If you're good at strategic games and you like challenges, then you'll like Nine Men's Morris as much as the Egyptians did.

The first Three/Six/Nine/Twelve Men's Morris gameboard was found in an Ancient Egyptian Temple. During the Bronze Age, traders brought the game to Ireland from Greece or Phoenicia. It then made its way into Europe. The game began to pick up names like Me'relles, Muhle, and Mill as it spread to other countries.

Ages

8 and older

Players

Two

Materials

Copy of game board and 6, 12, 18, or 24 playing pieces of two different colors (3, 6, 9, 12 of each).

Object

To either trap your opponent so he or she can no longer move or to capture all their playing pieces except for two.

Rules

The first person to play (be polite and let them go first) puts a piece over any of the white circles on your game board. Then the second person does the same. Your objective is to get three of your pieces in a row (which is called a "mill"). All the pieces in a "mill" must be on circles connected by lines. In other words, diagonal mills don't count. When you get a mill, you may remove and keep one of your opponent's pieces from the board. The only time a piece can be removed from an opponent's mill is when there are no other pieces available except those in a mill.

Once both players have put down all their pieces, they take turns moving their pieces along the lines in an effort to form a mill. You can only move one space at a time, and you can't move diagonally. Also, you may only move to adjacent open circles. You may not bump or jump an opponent's piece. Again, the forming of a mill allows for the removal of an opponent's piece.

If well planned, it is possible to play a piece that forms two mills. If this occurs, you can remove two of your opponent's pieces.

Play continues until a player can no longer move or is left with only two playing pieces on the board. Whichever outcome, this person loses the game.
Electronic File Download (Size 139 KB)

Customer Reviews

for Nine Men's Morris - Game Board and Rules by Derrick Brown
Great idea!
This is great!

I'm always looking for new games that the kids haven't seen before! Thanks for this! :)

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More about the seller

I am a newlywed, having married the former Keisha Lanier on March 26, 2011.

My *other* passion is empowering people via methods that balance skill & will, analysis & synthesis, ideas & execution, and activity & achievement.

I have published a digital catalog of more than 70 short films, learning games, visual dictionaries, poems, essays, newsletters, inspirational posters, and projects.

I have also delivered more than 30 presentations, workshops, keynote addresses, and invited lectures at conferences, high schools, colleges, universities, and churches.